“In It Together”: QC 2017 Conference Preview

Published on February 14, 2017 by

On April 5, 2017, Maine Quality Counts will once again bring together caregivers from across Maine to learn from national and state healthcare thought leaders, and from you and your colleagues, about “Achieving Excellence in Patient and Provider Experience.” We will not only hear from Dr. Berwick, but from caregivers and patients about their work and experiences improving patient and provider experience in patient care.

Early registration is February 2 – March 2 and regular registration is March 3 – 27. Register today.

Was there ever a better time for Don Berwick, M.D. to come to Maine and talk with us? National physician thought leader, former head of the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, and author of the Triple Aim, if there is anyone who can help us make sense of what might happen in an Obama to Trump transition in Washington, it would be Dr. Berwick. So when we put together this year’s Maine Quality Counts April 5, 2017 annual statewide healthcare conference on healthcare delivery improvement – “QC 2017 – In It Together: Achieving Excellence in Patient and Provider Experience” – we figured that Dr. Berwick should be there with us. And he will be, as our keynote speaker.

Improving patients’ experience in their care is one of Dr. Berwick’s Triple Aims. The case for doing that has always been strong, but in the last several years it has become compelling. For some caregivers it feels not just like a pressing priority, but an oppressive priority designed to keep patients satisfied even when that takes doing the wrong thing in their care (prescribing opioids or antibiotics against better judgment, for example). Patient advocacy groups, commercial insurers, employers, and the federal government are all pushing healthcare providers harder than ever to provide the best possible experience for patients getting something none of them wants to have to get: healthcare because they are sick.

Growing quietly in parallel, however, is also the case for improving caregiver experience. Caregiver burnout, fueled by the pace of change and what feels too many of them like trying to do everything everyone wants in the care of every patient for more patients every day, is now endemic, and perhaps epidemic, in primary and other care settings.

MAGAZINE- 12/17/03; Boston- Dr. Donald Berwick poses for a portrait at his Boston organization The Institute of Healthcare Improvement. Photo by Laurie Swope
(DIGITAL IMAGE)

It threatens not only the emotional health of caregivers, but is an increasing threat to our current efforts to transform patient care. Indeed, many of us trying to lead change in healthcare are now facing practitioners and practices so overwhelmed that they want to cough up one more practice change initiative like a big hairball.

On April 5, 2017, Maine Quality Counts will once again bring together caregivers from across Maine to learn from national and state healthcare thought leaders, and from you and your colleagues, about “Achieving Excellence in Patient and Provider Experience.” We will not only hear from Dr. Berwick, but from caregivers and patients about their work and experiences improving patient and provider experience in patient care.

Our 18 breakout sessions will include presentations about collaborative projects between patients and caregivers to improve the experience of both, and about the implicit biases we all have as silent participants in many patient-caregiver interactions. The sessions include one on food security, a topic that some caregivers might not think of as related to patient experience of care, but about which they would be wrong. This and another session get at what patients are really worried about, regardless of what they make the appointment about, and remind us that caregivers are hard pressed to have rewarding relationships with patients who cannot engage with us because we aren’t engaged with them around their most important needs.

Breakout session at QC 2016.

A session on activation of African refugees should not only help those of us caring for such populations, but have lessons about crossing divides to any marginalized population. Ben Tipton, PA-C of Mid Coast Parkview Health will do a presentation on the integration of mindfulness into healthcare, patient care, and self-care. Barbara Sorondo, MD of Eastern Maine Medical Center will present on the use of all those patient care portals we have built into EMRs to improve patient experience and the quality of care in primary care. Other presentations will focus on training and including the broader healthcare team in improving patient engagement and experience.

The theme that we hope the presentations all help to build is that reflected in the QC 2017 title – “In It Together.” When done at the end of your day (3:30 PM, we promise!) we hope to have helped convince you there is no high quality of caregiver experience without a high quality of patient experience, and vice versa. We hope to have provided you with tools and energy to help you succeed at this shared work. And as always, Maine Quality Counts hopes to have helped you along the path to building successful patient-caregiver, and the ability for us all in patient care to find joy in our work.


Early bird registration is open now through March 2. Regular registration takes place March 3-27. All QC individual and organizational members receive a special discounted rate. Not a member? Consider joining as an individual member at the Changemaker level or at the organizational level that best meets the needs and size of your organization. Learn more about becoming a member and send questions to membership@mainequalitycounts.org.

 
  1. Ron Dexter says:

    Thank you for a wonderful day. Thank you also for allowing me to come with Sue Woods, MD, MPH. to discuss Open Notes.



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